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This study on women rough sleepers who are the victims of domestic violence, supported by Daphne III programme of the EU, generated the Final Report and Executive summary by authors Dr Moss and K. Singh, P. The objectives of this project have been to undertake research into the characteristics and needs of women rough sleepers, and also current service provision, policy and practice. The research also aimed to create a network or hub of specialism in this field for all European countries.

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This UK study conducted on behalf of Communities and Local Government (CLG) by the Centre for Housing Policy, working in association with the Centre for Criminal Justice, Economics and Psychology, at the University of York on the effectiveness of schemes to enable households at risk of domestic violence to remain in their own homes.

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In UK Better Housing Briefing Paper 9 authors Aisha Gill and Baljit Banga are stating that there is national evidence that people from black, minority ethnic and refugee (BMER) backgrounds find it difficult to access services, and are less likely to be aware of services and housing options available to them which is a particular problem for more vulnerable individuals, such as older people, homeless people and victims of domestic violence.

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This UK research report has been compiled by the Policy Research Institute, University of Wolverhampton on behalf of the Shrewsbury Rough Sleepers Task Force to undertake research on Women Rough Sleepers in Shrewsbury by authors Dr Moss, K. Singh, P. and Southern, L. The focus of this report is on women who are termed ‘rough sleepers’ within the area of Shrewsbury and Atcham.

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This USA study of domestic violence shelters in eight states was performed by Eleanor 
Lyon 
&
 Shannon 
Lane from the University
 of 
Connecticut, School
 of
 Social
 Work and Anne
 Menard from National
 Resource
 Center
 on
 Domestic
 Violence. It was designed to help fill a gap in current knowledge about the range of services provided, the needs and experiences of survivors who have turned to shelters for help, and the types of help they received. Research goals included obtaining a large and diverse sample of survivors and shelter programs, so that meaningful comparisons of services, immediate outcomes, and experiences could be conducted by presence of children, age, education, race/ethnicity and other characteristics of survivors, while also taking shelter program capacity into account.

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Commissioned by London Councils and carried out by the Women’s Resource Centre, this UK research examined funding given to women’s refuges in London from April to June 2007. London boroughs and refuge providers were surveyed to determine a number of issues relating to the provision and delivery of services.

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This UK research by Reeve, K., Casey R and Goudie R. from the Centre for Regional Economic and Social Research, Sheffield Hallam University suggests that despite advances in homelessness policy and legislation over the past decade, homeless women are enduring traumatic and difficult homelessness situations and experiences. Many are not receiving the assistance theyrequire with accessing accommodation, reflecting the fact that often their wider situations, needs and vulnerabilities are not being adequately taken into account bylocal authorities. As a result, many are sleeping rough, placing themselves in danger of assault and sexual attack, and many more are living in a range of hidden and marginalised housing situations. Very vulnerable women who have already experienced traumas in their lives are still becoming homeless and are not getting help in addressing their other needs.

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This USA study by authors Humphreys, J. and Lee, K. describes objective and subjective sleep in a convenience sample of 29 battered women living in specialized transitional housing programs compared to 30 women living in their own stable home environment. Compared to healthy controls, battered women living in transitional housing experienced longer sleep onset latencies by both subjective and objective measures and higher percentage of time awake during the night by objective measure. Poor sleep quality may reflect the relative contributions of less total sleep time, difficulty falling asleep, and more awakenings during the night rather than just one aspect of disturbed sleep. Findings suggest that battered women in transitional housing programs may improve daytime alertness and benefit from interventions directed toward reducing sleep onset latency as well as increasing total sleep time.

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This Australian research project constitutes an analysis of service needs, barriers to service,problems at the service interface and service gaps for people experiencing/escaping SSDV. Homelessness and Same Sex Domestic Violence in the Supported Accommodation Assistance Program in Australia. This project has been made possible by a grant from the Department of Family and Community Services’ (FaCS) SAAP Coordination and Development Committee.

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This UK research, published by Office of the Deputy Prime Minister Report was commissioned by DETR in 1998, with the Women’s Unit and the Department of Health. It aimed to explore how local housing authorities catered for the accommodation and support needs of women and their children who had been accepted as homeless due to domestic violence, and the role of local refuge groups in meeting these needs.

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